ROSACEA:
IT'S COMPLICATED

Dealing with rosacea can feel like a private battle, but it may help to remember that you're not alone. The National Rosacea Society (NRS) estimates that at least 16 million Americans struggle with rosacea. And researchers are hard at work looking for triggers and seeking solutions.

 

Potential Triggers

 

Click a trigger.

Sun Exposure

According to an NRS survey, sun exposure is a big rosacea trigger for many people. Whenever you spend time outdoors, protect your face with SPF 30 or higher.

Certain Foods & Drinks

Food triggers vary widely, but common ones include red wine, spicy food, hot liquids, cheese, and chocolate. Try keeping a food journal to identify problem foods. Over time, you may start to notice that certain items are causing flare-ups.

Skin Care Products

Avoid scrubs and products with too many ingredients. Products with alcohol, witch hazel, fragrances, and mint oils are irritants for many people with rosacea. Wash your face with an alcohol- and fragrance-free cleanser, rinse with lukewarm water, and blot dry with a soft cotton towel.

Family History

Rosacea tends to run in families, so if you have rosacea, chances are high that you have a family member who has it too. All skin types can get it, but people with fair skin and Eastern or Northern European ancestry tend to be more likely to have rosacea.

Weather & Temperature

Protect your face from the cold and wind with a soft scarf, but avoid warming up too close to a fire! The heat of the flames can heat up symptoms, too. In the summer, soak up the AC instead of the sun. In the shower or bath, resist turning up the heat.

Exercise

If you work out outdoors, go out early in the day or early in the evening when it’s not so hot. If you exercise indoors, keep close to a fan or AC. Stay hydrated with cool fluids or ice.

Stress

Learn to manage your stress. Eat a good diet, get enough sleep, and practice some relaxation techniques. Meditation, deep breathing, and gentle stretches are good ways to slow the mind and relax the body.

Demodex

Everyone has Demodex mites on their face (they live in our pores), but research shows that a bacteria that lives in the mite—or even the mites themselves—could trigger inflammation that shows up on the face in the form of bumps and blemishes. Researchers think that reducing the number of Demodex mites on the face may help relieve rosacea symptoms.

Sun Exposure

Sun Exposure

+

According to an NRS survey, sun exposure is a big rosacea trigger for many people. Whenever you spend time outdoors, protect your face with SPF 30 or higher.

Certain Foods & Drinks

Certain Foods & Drinks

+

Food triggers vary widely, but common ones include red wine, spicy food, hot liquids, cheese, and chocolate. Try keeping a food journal to identify problem foods. Over time, you may start to notice that certain items are causing flare-ups.

Skin Care Products

Skin Care Products

+

Avoid scrubs and products with too many ingredients. Products with alcohol, witch hazel, fragrances, and mint oils are irritants for many people with rosacea. Wash your face with an alcohol- and fragrance-free cleanser, rinse with lukewarm water, and blot dry with a soft cotton towel.

Family History

Family History

+

Rosacea tends to run in families, so if you have rosacea, chances are high that you have a family member who has it too. All skin types can get it, but people with fair skin and Eastern or Northern European ancestry tend to be more likely to have rosacea.

Weather & Temperature

Weather & Temperature

+

Protect your face from the cold and wind with a soft scarf, but avoid warming up too close to a fire! The heat of the flames can heat up symptoms, too. In the summer, soak up the AC instead of the sun. In the shower or bath, resist turning up the heat.

Exercise

Exercise

+

If you work out outdoors, go out early in the day or early in the evening when it’s not so hot. If you exercise indoors, keep close to a fan or AC. Stay hydrated with cool fluids or ice.

Stress

Stress

+

Learn to manage your stress. Eat a good diet, get enough sleep, and practice some relaxation techniques. Meditation, deep breathing, and gentle stretches are good ways to slow the mind and relax the body.

Demodex

Demodex

+

Everyone has Demodex mites on their face (they live in our pores), but research shows that a bacteria that lives in the mite—or even the mites themselves—could trigger inflammation that shows up on the face in the form of bumps and blemishes. Researchers think that reducing the number of Demodex mites on the face may help relieve rosacea symptoms.

FAQ

Rosacea's
Emotional Effects

NRS surveys show that rosacea symptoms can have a serious impact on emotional well-being, which can affect sufferers both personally and professionally.

76%

76% of patients surveyed said rosacea lowered their self-confidence

60% said rosacea affected their professional interactions

60% said rosacea affected their professional interactions


Want to know more?

The NRS has a wealth of information about rosacea triggers and treatment.

Visit NRS.org »